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Failure to Know The Law

Common practice pitfalls: How to avoid them

Man on highwire

Lawyers’ Professional Indemnity Company (LAWPRO) was created to insure lawyers against legal malpractice claims. Most (though not all) claims are brought by a lawyer’s own client and include an allegation that the lawyer made a mistake or did not meet the standard of care expected of him or her when delivering legal services. No lawyer… Read More »

Categories: 2016 Student Issue 4, Articles, Communications Errors, Failure to Know The Law, Inadequate Investigation, Law students/new lawyers, Limitation Periods, New Lawyers, Time Management

Providing high quality service to Indigenous clients

Just as the final research for this article was being completed in November, newly-elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced his Cabinet, including the appointment of Jody Wilson-Raybould as Minister of Justice and Attorney General. The next morning, a cautiously hopeful mood filled the room as a group of Aboriginal lawyers gathered at the Law Society… Read More »

Categories: 2016 January Indigenous, Aboriginal, Articles, Communications Errors, Dabbling, Diversity, Failure to Know The Law, Features, Inadequate Investigation, Indigenous clients

Potential claims related to serving Indigenous clients

We hope that January 2016 issue of LAWPRO Magazine has contributed to your understanding of the incredible breadth and complexity of “Aboriginal law.” We would not be fulfilling our risk management mandate, however, if we didn’t contribute our own perspective as claims prevention specialists. To avoid claims, lawyers need to know how they develop. What… Read More »

Categories: 2016 January Indigenous, Aboriginal, Articles, Communications Errors, Failure to Know The Law, Features, Inadequate Investigation, Indigenous clients, Practice Tips

OHIP subrogated claims

Counsel liability issues raised by OHIP subrogated claims Counsel representing clients who seek compensation for injuries caused by another’s negligence or wrongdoing are encouraged to be mindful that the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care may also be entitled to recover its costs for health care and medical treatment provided to the injured party from… Read More »

Categories: 2016 January Indigenous, Articles, Civil Litigation, Communications Errors, Failure to Know The Law, Personal injury, Practice Tips

Warning: Insurers can ‘contract out’ of the Limitations Act, 2002 in ‘non-consumer’ policies

The law of limitations applicable to insurance claims has entered a period of uncertainty, arising in part from insurers’ ability to “contract out” of the Limitations Act, 2002 (LA 2002) where the insured is not a “consumer.” Claims on group long-term disability policies may prove especially hazardous. This article discusses this new development, and touches… Read More »

Categories: 2014 September Diversity, Articles, Casebook, Civil Litigation, Failure to Know The Law, Limitation Periods

Diversify without dabbling: Before expanding your practice, expand your competence

Think you have the confidence to bluff your way through a file that’s outside your normal scope of practice? It might work if you were playing a lawyer on TV… but that’s only because your opponent (and the judge, if it’s a litigation file) would be actors, too. In the real world, trying to “fake… Read More »

Categories: 2012 August Checklists, Articles, Dabbling, Failure to Know The Law, Legal Careers, Practice Tips
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